Category Archives: oriole

Black Swamp Warblers

I resolved to visit the Black Swamp area east of Toledo, Ohio after a terrific presentation at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology by Kim and Ken Kaufman.  I was not disappointed. The number of warblers and other spring migrants is overwhelming, and the ability to be at eye level with the birds remarkable.  My most productive time was along the boardwalk at Magee Marsh.  I will make this an annual outing for future years.

There were several warblers that particularly caught my attention.   First was the Prothonotary Warblers. Some were as close as 5 feet.  Try focusing on that!

I’ve posted high resolution images in a gallery on my website at:

http://pschmitt.smugmug.com/Birds/Perching-Birds/18761402_G84qx9#!i=1847010336&k=9Kdz6Gh

In the link above, you’ll also find a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, a Palm Warbler and  the Blackburnian Warbler below:

I’ve written a further commentary with more details in my personal blog at:    http://birds-n-blooms.blogspot.com/

Paul Schmitt

Great Conditions for Nature Photography

The sun is shining, the reports of new birds are filling my email and a great weekend is coming. So, my message for CNP members is to be sure to set aside some time to get out and photograph. I only have to step outside my door to have wildflowers emerging in bloom, and birds singing.

Met up with CNP member David Duneau at the Mundy Wildflower Garden on Cornell campus this Wednesday.  I’ve posted a longer blog on my personal site at:

Birds-n-Blooms

To briefly summarize, we were looking for birds, but not having much luck getting close.   As we wrapped up on the parking lot, we saw incredible activity in nearby apple tree that was rich with blooms.   The most exciting was a fantastically colorful Baltimore Oriole.

A Northern Cardinal was also pretty cooperative.

For CNP members looking to try some bird photos for  themselves, I’d begin at the apple tree next to the Horticulture Building off of Caldwell Road.  It’s just to the right of the building.

We also saw an uncommon Nashville Warbler in the tree.  Warblers are harder for me because they are so often hidden inside the tree or bush, seem to move constantly and are very small.  Perhaps the richest place right now is the Hawthorn Orchard behind the tennis center on campus.  Seemingly dozens of different birds in the cover.

I’ll be unable to attend the next CNP meeting, but I hope to see reports of your success and perhaps a post here too.

Paul S.